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Low Dose Naltrexone: A Possible Safe Effective Treatment for AutoImmune Disease and Cancer

Title
Low Dose Naltrexone: A Possible Safe Effective Treatment for AutoImmune Disease and Cancer
Publication Type
Book Chapter
Research Type
Human
Reported as
Review
Date
June 20, 2011
Authors
Paul J. Battle
Institution
Barolat Neuroscience
Link
Abstract

Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist drug that has been used safely for 25 years in addiction medicine. Research has shown that in addition to its opiate antagonist properties at 50-300mg per day dosages, it has immunoregulatory properties at dosages as low as 3.0mg.  Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) improves the clinical state of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. Another impressive property of LDN is its ability to arrest cancer cell growth.  The remarkable fact is that LDN can enhance for thse two major disease classifications with little or no side effects.  This paper will describe the science behind LDN's physiological mechanisms to reduce the effects of autoimmune disease and inhibit cancer cell growth.  The author hopes to generate research interest in these mechanisms of disease modification, which enjance the body's own immune system without side effects.

Anti-Aging Therapeutics, Volume 12, Chapter 3 ""Low Dose Naltrexone: A Possible Safe Effective Treatment for AutoImmune Disease and Cancer"". Proceedings of the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine's (A4M) Seventeenth World Congress on Anti-Aging Medicine & Regenerative Biomedical Technologies, Spring, Summer and Winter Sessions (2009 conference year)