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"She's Like A Puppy Again!": Maggie's Recovery from Arthritis & a Torn ACL

Maggie The Bulldog
June 27, 2018

About Canine Arthritis

Arthritis, abnormal joint changes typically characterized by joint inflammation and degeneration is common and difficult to manage in dogs. There may be obvious indicators of pain, limping, lameness, restricted mobility or range of motion, or be a milder ""careful"" attitude on the dog’s part when changing positions. Xrays may reveal joint degeneration or bony growths. Unfortunately, when a dog reduces use of joints because of discomfort, it can result in weight gain and further limited joint mobility.

About Canine Torn ACL

A torn or ruptured anterior (or cranial) cruciate ligament can cause a dog to go lame in one of the hind legs. This ligament connects the back of the femur (the bone above the knee) with the front of the tibia (the bone below the knee). This ligament is responsible for keeping the tibia in place beneath the femur and stabilizing the knee joint. Depending on the severity of the injury, a dog may be unable to bear weight on the injured leg, and there may be swelling on the inside of the knee. Lack of a healthy ACL can cause the bones to rub against one another, leading to spurs, pain, arthritis, and decreased range of motion. Without surgery, degenerative changes may occur, leading to further disability and pain.

Could you please share the story of Maggie, your family dog?

When I married Alan, I inherited this adorable bulldog named Maggie. I think she sensed I wasn’t well (before I was on LDN) because she followed me wherever I went...it was almost like she was a guard dog. Unfortunately, Maggie had severe arthritis, and the poor girl had a hard time getting up from a sitting position and really couldn't move too quickly. She also had a bad limp.

Once we started having success using LDN for Alan's osteoarthritis, we decided to let Maggie try it for her debilitating arthritis
What made you consider LDN for Maggie?

Once we started having success using LDN for Alan's osteoarthritis, we decided to let Maggie try it for her debilitating arthritis. We had seen such good results ourselves (as can be seen from my story and our LDN journey together), we thought, “what if”? It seemed a reasonable idea to see if LDN might help her.

Maggie
How did you figure out how much LDN to give Maggie?

We read in various online groups that LDN was being given successfully to dogs. When giving to dogs, you give the amount of LDN by weight. In the beginning, we gave Maggie 0.5 mg of LDN and I think we eventually worked up to giving her 1.5 mg. We compounded 50 mg tablets into liquid LDN, and tried using a syringe to give it to her by mouth. Ultimately we started pouring it on her food and she didn't seem to notice the bitter taste, so that was much easier.

Once we gave Maggie the LDN, the limping stopped and she was up running around again in no time
What happened with Maggie when you started her on LDN?

The results were immediate and dramatic. Once we gave Maggie the LDN, the limping stopped and she was up running around again in no time. We could tell it was working because she used to struggle getting up and down, and all of a sudden she was just getting up and running with Alan up and down the halls, one of her favorite things to do. She also started playing again. Here she was, an 8 year old dog, acting like a puppy...it was wonderful to see.

Later on, Maggie injured herself. What happened?

Maggie tore her anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Because she had a heart issue and seizures, she wasn’t a candidate for surgery to fix it. She was also 8 years old at that time, and this is a type of dog that doesn’t typically live much past age 10. Since surgery for such a dog wasn’t a possibility, we had to find another way of helping her.

The vet told us that Maggie would always limp and be in pain, and there was nothing we could do to help her. Well...LDN to the rescue!
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What did the veterinarian say about Maggie’s prognosis?

The vet told us that Maggie would always limp and be in pain, and there was nothing we could do to help her. Well...LDN to the rescue! Maggie was already on LDN, and within a couple of weeks, despite having the torn ACL, she was back to being herself! She no longer limped and she returned to playing with Alan, which she loved. Her recovery was really amazing, and totally contrary to what the veterinarian predicted. Between the arthritis and the torn ACL…she did incredibly well on LDN. I’m sure it bought her a little more time on this earth, and it was a pleasure to have a happy dog again!

What did you learn from Maggie’s experience on LDN?

We learned that LDN has a lot of potential to benefit many conditions. Later, we used this knowledge when our son Dustin was struggling with a lack of options for his sick dog Rocky. Rocky’s LDN story is particularly interesting because we have pictures that document Rocky’s malignant tumors shrinking and disappearing after starting LDN. It’s really remarkable.

More About Maggie:

Maggie, a family dog that brought much delight into the Koshak family, gained unexpected mobility from LDN. If you have questions about our canine LDN experiences, please feel free to write to us at [email protected] or [email protected]